Newsletters
Business News for Technology Decision-Makers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Home Business Briefing Mobile Industry News Small Business Tech Trends More Topics...
Vblock™ Systems:
Advanced converged infrastructure
increases productivity & lowers costs.

www.vce.com
Mobile Tech
Real-time info services with Neustar
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
LG Launching a Bendable Display
LG Launching a Bendable Display

By Barry Levine
March 29, 2012 12:50PM

Bookmark and Share
In addition to bendability and durability, LG said the lighter and thinner Electronic Paper Display offers reduced eye fatigue, more efficient energy use and lower prices. Other companies besides LG are entering the flexible screen market. Samsung said last month that it was mass producing flexible OLED displays, and expected products this year.
 

Related Topics

Bendable Display
LG
Samsung
E-Ink


A bendable electronic paper display. The 21st Century is about to get such a product, with LG planning a launch next month of its electronic paper display, or EPD, product.

The EPD is a 6-inch e-ink plastic screen, 0.7 mm thick, with a resolution of 1024 x 768, and it bends up to 40 degrees at the center. The company said the screen is now being mass produced, and will be available first to manufacturers in China, followed by release to companies in Europe.

'World's First Plastic EPD'

The key initial market for the screen is e-book readers. Sang Duck Yeo, an executive in LG's Mobile/OLED division, said in a statement that this product, "the world's first plastic EPD," will help boost the popularization of the e-book market.

LG said that this product is the first in a series of new kinds of displays the South Korean company is intending to release in the future, including plastic OLED and other kinds of flexible displays.

LG said that EPD provides a reading experience akin to paper, with a plastic substrate "as slim as cell phone protection film" and a flexible design. Compared to existing glass EPD, the plastic EPD is one-third slimmer and half the weight.

The company also said that e-book users have wanted a more durable display, since about 10 percent of users have accidentally damaged their screens by dropping them. But, by comparison, the plastic EPD is scratch-resistant if dropped from 4 feet, which is the average height of reading while standing.

When put through a break and scratch test that involved hitting the screen with a small urethane hammer, the screen suffered no scratches or breakage.

High-Temperature Manufacture

In addition to durability, LG said the lighter and thinner screen offered reduced eye fatigue, more efficient energy consumption and lower prices.

To manufacture the new screens, LG said it has developed a unique technique that uses the high TFT process, involving temperatures of more than 350 degrees. The new technique overcame the issues of manufacturing heat-susceptible plastic using such a process.

LG has been showing demonstrations of new kinds of versatile e-ink displays for several years. In early 2010, for instance, it showed a 19-inch, metal-foil electronic prototype that resembled a newspaper. In 2009, it showed a 11.5-inch sheet of flexible e-paper.

One of the biggest hopes for flexible screens, of course, is that those small devices users carry in their pockets will eventually have a flexible, larger screen that can be pulled out when needed.

Other companies are also getting into the new flexible screen market. Samsung said in February that it was mass producing flexible OLED displays, and expected products with the new screens to be released this year. Samsung has said it is developing a foldable OLED screen that has no seam and allows a device to be folded in half -- and then opened up to show a combined, larger screen.

Nokia has also shown a concept phone, the GEM, in which the entire surface of the device -- front, side, back -- was a single, touch-sensitive display.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Sarah:

Posted: 2012-03-30 @ 10:19am PT
Every now and then I see a technology that really makes me go, "wow!", and this is definitely one of them. If this does come to fruition, it would be a really ironic twist for e-book readers and tablets to go from solid rectangle devices to actually resembling books. LG could really shake up the e-reader and table market with this technology.

Sarah
Mosaic Technology
www.mosaictec.com



Barium Ferrite Is The Future Of Tape: Barium Ferrite (BaFe) offers greater capacity, superior performance, and longer archival life compared to legacy metal particle (MP) tape. Click here to learn more.


 Mobile Tech
1.   OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon
2.   Samsung: $2.2B Too Much for Apple
3.   Review: Windows Phone Advances
4.   Microsoft-Nokia Deal Closes this Week
5.   Samsung Data Center Catches Fire


advertisement
BlackBerry Drops T-Mobile After Spat
Moving on to other carriers after snub.
Average Rating:
OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon
Smartphone could shake up market.
Average Rating:
Samsung: $2.2B Too Much for Apple
Says $38.4M more like it for patents.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Business
Home/Top News | Business Briefing | Mobile Industry News | Small Business | Tech Trends | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Innovation
E-Commerce | CIO Issues | Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.